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Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Würzburg will together investigate the quantum phenomena of topological materials and the opportunities they present within quantum computing. With Professors Detlev Grützmacher, Stefan Tautz, Stefan Blügel and David DiVincenzo, four JARA-FIT scientists are involved in the project.

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The smallest interactions with the environment can result in the loss of sensitive effects in quantum systems. Researchers from TU Delft, and JARA partners RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich now describe an experiment in which a quantum system consisting of two coupled atoms behaves stably under electron bombardment. The experiment could provide an indication that quantum states in a quantum computer can also be realized more easily in certain cases than previously thought.

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Quantum devices are extremely sensitive to their environment, which complicates modeling their behavior and developing their applications. For example, external influences can delay the response of quantum devices. A scientific team at the JARA-FIT Institute for Quantum Information has now succeeded in showing how responses can be more simply modeled as if there is no time delay, without introducing any error. Their results were recently published in the journal "Physical Review X".

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Several characteristics of graphene make the material interesting for the design and development of spin qubits for future quantum computers. It is therefore not surprising that research on graphene-based quantum dots has been going on for more than a decade. A team of researchers led by JARA-FIT Director Prof. Christoph Stampfer has now made major progresses in the technology for confining and manipulating electrons in bilayer graphene quantum dots bringing the demonstration of graphene-based qubits within reach. The group has already published several papers on this topic in renowned journals.

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Groundbreaking science needs the right environment and the right expertise. A good example of this is the JARA Institute for Quantum Information (JARA-IQI), whose home is RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich. In this highly reputed technological environment, the scientists of the JARA-IQI Institute are researching and working on the realization of a quantum computer to meet the challenges of modern society. The new video illustrates which paths and approaches the researchers of the JARA-IQI Institute are pursuing.

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Germany has long been among the world leaders in the race to develop a quantum computer. As part of the BMBF-funded QUASAR project, top-class research institutions, universities and companies now aim to jointly apply the results into practice. The goal is a semiconductor quantum processor made in Germany that is based on the "shuttling" of electrons and is to be achieved with technology available in Germany. Project coordinator is Prof. Hendrik Bluhm, director at the JARA Institute for Quantum Information.

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A team around JARA-FIT member Prof. Stefan Tautz, together with colleagues from Marburg and Graz, has acquired electron orbital images with extremely high time resolution to track electrons in a chemical reaction in time and space. The investigations of the international research team not only contribute to the fundamental understanding of chemical reactions and electron transfer processes, but also open up future perspectives for the optimization of interfaces and nanostructures. The results were published in the journal Science.

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Billed as the fastest computers of the future, expectations for quantum computers are correspondingly high. But there are still a number of hurdles to overcome before they can be realized. One of these challenges is the fragility of the quantum bits, or qubits for short. Until now, the various perturbations could only be eliminated with great effort. A team from the two JARA partners Forschungszentrum Jülich and RWTH Aachen University, led by JARA professor David DiVincenzo, has now presented a design for a circuit with passive error correction that would simplify the construction of quantum computers.

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On February fourth, 2021, a consortium of 19 leading European research institutions announced the launch of a large-scale EU flagship initiative. The four-year Quantum Large-Scale Integration with Silicon (QLSI) project aims to scale silicon quantum technologies. The strong partners and ambitious project will lay the foundation for the industrial implementation of semiconductor quantum processors in the EU and put Europe at the forefront of the world in quantum information. One of the institutions involved in the project is the JARA partner Forschungszentrum Jülich.

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Several new information technologies seem to have sprung from science fiction and impress with more performance in the smallest of spaces. One of these technologies is Ferroelectric Random Access Memory, or FeRAM for short. These components combine work and data storage in one. Now, a team of scientists from the JARA partners RWTH and Forschungszentrum Jülich have found a possible way to further miniaturize the FeRAM bits.

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Numerous research teams around the world are working on optimizing hydrogen electrolysis in order to produce the coveted fuel as cost-effectively as possible and, above all, in a climate-neutral manner. A team of scientists from Jülich, Aachen and Berkeley has now discovered that an extremely thin layer of a catalyst material can double the activity for the water splitting reaction. Among others, the institute of JARA-FIT member Prof. Rainer Waser was significantly involved in the investigations.

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The Kondo effect refers to an anomalous behavior of electrical resistance in metals with magnetic interference. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, the effect was first studied by US researchers in the late 1990s. Many of the studies based on this may have to be re-examined now that Jülich researchers have shown that the Kondo effect cannot be proven beyond doubt in this way. Instead, another phenomenon produces precisely the spectroscopic "fingerprint" that was previously attributed to the Kondo effect.

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Skyrmions are small magnetic whirls that appear in certain combinations of materials. In data storage, they are regarded as the future information carriers. Scientists in Aachen, Kiel and Reykjavík found out that these so-called magnetic nanoknots can dissolve in two ways. JARA-FIT member Prof. Markus Morgenstern played a key role in the investigations.

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To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Physical Review A, the science magazine has taken a look back and compiled a collection of milestone articles. The collection contains papers that have made important contributions to atomic, molecular and optical physics and quantum information. JARA Professor David DiVincenzo is represented twice in the collection.

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Prof. Andreas Wallraff, an expert in the field of quantum information, is one of this year's recipients of a Helmholtz International Fellow Award from the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres (HGF). The award enables the scientist from the ETH Zurich to expand an existing cooperation with scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich.

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The demands for modern materials, which are used in communication technology, for example, are very high. Efficiency, sustainability, space and cost savings are just a few of the keywords that are related to this. Meeting these demands requires the design of novel materials with specific characteristics. Scientists from Jülich and Berlin have now succeeded in bringing together artificial intelligence and nanotechnology to structure a material surface at the molecular level.

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Mesocrystals consist of a three-dimensional periodic arrangement of nanoparticles or nanocrystals. The arrangement of the particles within the mesocrystal makes it possible to evoke different characteristics. To enable this modification, an international team has now investigated the size distribution of the nanocrystals. In addition to other experts, JARA-FIT member Prof. Thomas Brückel played a key role in the work.

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The group of M. Morgenstern at RWTH Aachen University and the group of S. Lounis at Forschungszentrum Jülich, united in the Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance, discovered that single foreign atoms halt the motion of magnetic vortex cores that consists of about 10.000 atoms. They studied the resulting interaction in detail with the help of a dedicated scanning tunneling microscope developed in Aachen. The microscope enables imaging and manipulating of the magnetic nanostructures. The surprising novel result of a single atom stopper leads to novel design criteria for modern computer memories and is published in the well reputed journal Nature Communications.

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The human brain is still the most powerful and efficient computer in the world. Multiple processes proceed in parallel and the organ requires only a very small amount of energy. Not surprisingly, modern science wants to transfer the qualities of the brain to novel computer architectures. In the NEUROTEC project, under the umbrella of JARA, scientists from RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich are working on these so-called neuromorphic computer systems.

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Sometimes it's the little things that make the difference. Especially in the world at the nanometer scale. Prof Markus Ternes is a scientist and lecturer at the two JARA partners RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich. His research area is the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular model systems. Together with colleagues from Strasbourg and San Sebastián, Ternes has now refined scanning tunneling microscopy for his research in order to explore the magnetic structures of complex materials at the atomic scale.
Further information in german.

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The Materials Research Society (MRS) elected JARA Professor Matthias Wuttig as MRS Fellow 2019. For the fourth time a German scientist will receive this honour. With this award, MRS honors the physicist's outstanding and groundbreaking contributions to the advancement of phase-change materials, including unraveling their unique bonding mechanism, unconventional transport properties and unusual kinetics.

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Researchers from Jülich, Poland and Japan have discovered and analysed a new many-body state in an iron crystal. Its existence sheds new light on the physics of the interaction of conducting electrons and magnons which are excitations in magnetic systems. The JARA-FIT scientists Prof. Stefan Blügel and Prof. Claus Michael Schneider are significantly involved in the investigations.

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The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the list of new ERC Consolidator Grant holders. For the second time, JARA-FIT scientist Prof. Christoph Stampfer has been awarded an ERC Grant. After an ERC Starting Grant in 2011, the physicist will now receive a Consolidator Grant. The funding amounts to up to two million euros over a period of five years.

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The research team led by Dr. Gerard Verbiest and JARA-FIT scientist Prof. Christoph Stampfer at the Physics Department at the RWTH Aachen University, discovered a new possibility for ultrasound detection. The physicists fabricated a graphene resonator on a silicon substrate in a way that the device could be mounted onto an ultrasound transducer.

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The meteorite Bishunpur, which fell to Earth in 1895 in the Indian Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, could shed light on the magnetism at the beginning of the universe. In order to unravel the secrets of the meteorite, scientists at Research Centre Jülich, together with experts from England and Norway, have investigated the material using electron holography.

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Scientists JARA have discovered a phenomenon similar to the laser effect with which the structure of organic molecules can be examined at previously unmatched levels of precision. In contrast to a laser, this "raser" (radiowave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) is pumped with parahydrogen and does not operate at light frequencies, instead oscillating continuously at various radio frequencies of around 100 kHz. A precise fingerprint of the molecular structure can thus be obtained.

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Quantum computers are viewed as ultrafast computers of the future. The Scalable Solid State Quantum Computing project aims to establish the conditions for future multi-qubit systems. In order to realize such systems with several hundred qubits, new technologies are required so that the qubits can be precisely controlled. Forschungszentrum Jülich, RWTH Aachen University, and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are all involved in the project, which is being provided with € 6 million in funding by the Helmholtz Association.

You will find further information at the German-language JARA-Website

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Utilizing the magnetic moment (spin) of an electron leads to a faster and more energy efficient processing of bits and bytes than within the actual Si-based processors. So far, manipulation experiments of the spin revealed signals which are much too small for any practical application. A possible reason for the unfavorable efficiency has now...

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