About JARA

Learn more

JARA – Jülich Aachen Research Alliance

Focusing Expertise - Shaping the Future
In the Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich pool their outstanding expertise in five research sections, a JARA-Center and four

JARA-Instituts.These common efforts open up new research opportunities and facilitate projects that would not be attainable for either of the partners on their own. Furthermore, their attention is always focused on the grand challenges facing society.

JARA | CSD

The prestigious Association for Computing Machinery - ACM for short - has named Prof. Wil van der Aalst, Director of JARA-CSD and Chair of Computer Science 9 - Process and Data Science, a Fellow. Together with another computer scientist from RWTH Aachen University, he was recognized for his work. He was especially honored for his achievements in the areas of Process Mining, Process Management and Data Science.

Read more
JARA | FIT

Numerous research teams around the world are working on optimizing hydrogen electrolysis in order to produce the coveted fuel as cost-effectively as possible and, above all, in a climate-neutral manner. A team of scientists from Jülich, Aachen and Berkeley has now discovered that an extremely thin layer of a catalyst material can double the activity for the water splitting reaction. Among others, the institute of JARA-FIT member Prof. Rainer Waser was significantly involved in the investigations.

Read more
JARA | FIT

The Kondo effect refers to an anomalous behavior of electrical resistance in metals with magnetic interference. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, the effect was first studied by US researchers in the late 1990s. Many of the studies based on this may have to be re-examined now that Jülich researchers have shown that the Kondo effect cannot be proven beyond doubt in this way. Instead, another phenomenon produces precisely the spectroscopic "fingerprint" that was previously attributed to the Kondo effect.

Read more
JARA | FIT

Skyrmions are small magnetic whirls that appear in certain combinations of materials. In data storage, they are regarded as the future information carriers. Scientists in Aachen, Kiel and Reykjavík found out that these so-called magnetic nanoknots can dissolve in two ways. JARA-FIT member Prof. Markus Morgenstern played a key role in the investigations.

Read more