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JARA | FIT

Numerous research teams around the world are working on optimizing hydrogen electrolysis in order to produce the coveted fuel as cost-effectively as possible and, above all, in a climate-neutral manner. A team of scientists from Jülich, Aachen and Berkeley has now discovered that an extremely thin layer of a catalyst material can double the activity for the water splitting reaction. Among others, the institute of JARA-FIT member Prof. Rainer Waser was significantly involved in the investigations.

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JARA | FIT

The Kondo effect refers to an anomalous behavior of electrical resistance in metals with magnetic interference. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, the effect was first studied by US researchers in the late 1990s. Many of the studies based on this may have to be re-examined now that Jülich researchers have shown that the Kondo effect cannot be proven beyond doubt in this way. Instead, another phenomenon produces precisely the spectroscopic "fingerprint" that was previously attributed to the Kondo effect.

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JARA | FIT

Skyrmions are small magnetic whirls that appear in certain combinations of materials. In data storage, they are regarded as the future information carriers. Scientists in Aachen, Kiel and Reykjavík found out that these so-called magnetic nanoknots can dissolve in two ways. JARA-FIT member Prof. Markus Morgenstern played a key role in the investigations.

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JARA | FIT

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Physical Review A, the science magazine has taken a look back and compiled a collection of milestone articles. The collection contains papers that have made important contributions to atomic, molecular and optical physics and quantum information. JARA Professor David DiVincenzo is represented twice in the collection.

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JARA | BRAIN

Using simulations on the JURECA supercomputer and X-ray crystallography, Jülich researchers have clarified how sodium ions drive the transport of glutamate in the brain. The so-called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs for short, are responsible for this, which remove the messenger substance glutamate from the synaptic cleft between nerve cells. The article was published in the current issue of the renowned journal "Science Advances". The institute of Prof. Christoph Fahlke, a member of JARA-BRAIN and JARA-SOFT, was significantly involved in the research.

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